Vaccination
Requirements

    Dogs: Three Shots Required
1.) DHPP:   (Given  in a one or three year protocol)
THIS IS A COMBO VACCINATION THAT COVERS NUMEROUS DISEASES.  WHAT DO ALL THESE LETTERS
STAND FOR?

D = Distemper:
 Canine distemper is a widespread, high-mortality viral disease of dogs.  Exposure is considered
inevitable during a dog's lifetime, so canine distemper vaccination is almost always recommended.  Puppies and
young dogs without immunity are at greatest risk.  Canine distemper virus infects various tissues in the dog's body,
producing diarrhea, fever, nasal and ocular discharge, respiratory disease, appetite loss and neurologic signs such as
muscular spasms and paralysis.  The disease is easily transmitted and often fatal.

H = Hepatitis:  Infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) caused by canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV-1), is a worldwide disease
of dogs.  CAV-1 infects a wide range of tissues, including the liver (hence the name hepatitis), kidneys, spleen, and
lungs.  Infected dogs typically develop a fever, bleeding of gums,and soft tissue, and experience loss of white blood
cells that are a key component of the immune system.  Opacity of the eve ("blue eye") occurs in some cases.  Death,
chronic hepatitis, or severe illness may occur, and recovery may be gradual in non-fatal cases.  CAV-1 is shed in
urine, and can survive outside the host for weeks or months.

P = Parainfluenza:  Infectious respiratory disease is a troublesome problem in dogs because it is easily transmitted in
the air or by direct contact, expecially in kennels, dog parks, vet offices, and grooming facilities.  Upper respiratory
disease can limit the dog's activity, and progress to pneumonia, which can be life-threatening.  The most common
causes of respiratory infections in dogs include  canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine parainfluenza virus.  CAV-2
is closely related to CAV-1, the cause of infectious canine hepatitis (ICH).  For this reason, CAV-2 vaccines provide
dual protection against both ICH and respiratory disease caused by CAV-2.

P = Parvovirus:  Dogs are at risk of enteritis (intestinal disease) caused by two common viruses, canine parvovirus
and canine coronavirus.  Canine parvovirus enteritis is generally considered to be more severe than coronavirus
enteritis.  However, parvovirus enteritis may be more serious if coronavirus is also present.  Diarrhea and vomiting
caused by these viruses can range from mild to servere, and are accompanied by depression and loss of appetite.  
Unvaccinated puppies and young dogs are most commonly affected because they usually have not been previously
exposed or vaccinated and are susceptible to infection.  Viral enteritis is easily spread because of the large volume of
virus in feces, which contaminates the environment is readily spread from one animal to another.  Severe cases of
viral enteritis can be fatal due to dehydration and loss of appetite.  Puppies are at greatest risk of death because of
their limited body reserves.

2.) Bordetella (Kennel Cough):
(Given in a one year shot protocol or a six month nasal application)
Bordetella bronchiseptica bacteria which causes infectious tracheobronchitis ("kennel cough" or "canine cough") is a
persistent  respiratory disease with a harsh, dry cough.  It can persist for a few weeks.
PLEASE NOTE:  The shot vaccination takes 7-10 days to fully protect the dog; the nasal application of the
vaccination takes up to 72 hours to fully protect the dog.

3.) Rabies:   (Given in a one or three year protocol and is required by Ohio law)
Rabies is a virus that affects the nervous system and is always fatal. There is no known cure for rabies, to confirm a
case the brain tissue must be examined. In the United States raccoons, skunks, bats, foxes, and coyotes are the main
wild animal hosts for the illness. Symptoms generally include behavior change, difficulty swallowing, hypersalivation,
depression, stupor, and hind limp paralysis.



We strongly recommend that your dog(s) be treated for flea prevention prior to boarding with
KennelResorts.
Ask your veterinarian about monthly treatment with Advantage, Advantrix, or Frontline. Advantage
kills fleas for thirty days. Advantix kills fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes for thirty days. Frontline kills fleas for ninety days
and ticks for thirty days. Please keep in mind that the marketed flea preventions available in stores are not  nearly as
effective as the Advantage, Advantix, or Frontline provided by veterinarians. Also, store bought flea preventions are
considerably more likely to elicit an allergic reaction.



             
Cats: Two Shots Required
                                                         
1.) FVRCP:
THIS IS A COMBO VACCINATION THAT COVERS NUMEROUS DISEASES WITH ONE INJECTION.  WHAT DO ALL
THOSE LETTERS STAND FOR?

FVR = Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis:
This a horrible upper respiratory infection that is airborne and highly contagious
among cats. It causes sneezing and coughing with discharge from the eyes and nose, also infected cats will have loss
of appetite and a fever. Young kittens and senior cats are more susceptible to this infection and many require
hospitalization to recover.

C = Calicivirus: This is another upper respiratory infection with symptoms similar to feline viral rhinotracheitis. These
infections account for 95% of upper respiratory infections in cats. The disease is spread through direct contact with an
infected cat or objects, for example a food dish or toy.

P = Panleukopenia: This is also known as feline distemper. It is highly contagious and deadly among cats. It is similar
to the parvovirus seen in dogs. Symptoms include vomiting and diarrhea, weakness, dehydration, tremors, and loss of
coordination. A low white blood cell count is also common. Cats with feline distemper need to be hospitalized and have
intensive care. Mortality rate is high. The vaccine has worked wonders in preventing this and other highly contagious
diseases.    


2.) Rabies:
Rabies is a virus that affects the nervous system and is always fatal. There is no known cure for rabies, to confirm a
case the brain tissue must be examined. In the United States raccoons, skunks, bats, foxes, and coyotes are the main
wild animal hosts for the illness. Symptoms generally include behavior change, difficulty swallowing, hypersalivation,
depression, stupor, and hind limp paralysis.
Dogs/cats that come to KennelResorts must be current on all vaccinations.